Dragged Off Flight Due to Overbooking? Here’s What You Should Know.

By: Customer’s Poet

While United CEO Oscar Muñoz may have issued a public apology, the damage has already been done as the company’s stock is down by as much as 6% in premarket trading. Unfortunately for them, bad news travels fast.

Understanding all the trouble United has gotten itself into over customer service, even after reading that is not usually known for putting customers off of planes, here’s what you should know if an airline asks you to voluntarily give up your seat on an overbooked flight.

According to Popular Mechanics, airlines do have the power to remove a traveler from a plane, for any reason they deem necessary. When you purchase an airline ticket, you are entering into a contract, known as a “contract of carriage.” Few consumers exercise their right to get a copy of the lengthy document, much less read it, but they might reconsider that after this week’s United fiasco.

If you did not know your rights as an airline customer in the US, here are a few in regards to overbooking according to the US Department of Transportation:

Overbooking is not illegal. Most airlines overbook their scheduled flights to a certain extent in order to compensate for “no-shows.” Passengers are sometimes left behind or “bumped” as a result. When an oversale occurs, the Department of Transportation (DOT) requires airlines to ask people who aren’t in a hurry to give up their seats voluntarily, in exchange for compensation. Those passengers bumped against their will are, with a few exceptions, entitled to compensation.

Voluntary Bumping

DOT rules require airlines to seek out people who are willing to give up their seats for compensation before bumping anyone involuntarily. Here’s how this works. At the check-in or boarding area, airline employees will look for volunteers when it appears that the flight has been oversold. If you’re not in a rush to arrive at your next destination, you can give your reservation back to the airline in exchange for compensation and a later flight. But before you do this, you may want to get answers to these important questions:

• When is the next flight on which the airline can confirm your seat? The alternate flight may be just as acceptable to you. On the other hand, if the airline offers to put you on standby on another flight that’s full, you could be stranded.

• Will the airline provide other amenities such as free meals, a hotel room, transfers between the hotel and the airport, and a phone card? If not, you might have to spend the money it offers you on food or lodging while you wait for the next flight.

DOT has not mandated the form or amount of compensation that airlines offer to volunteers. DOT does, however, require airlines to advise any volunteer whether he or she might be involuntarily bumped and, if that were to occur, the amount of compensation that would be due. Carriers can negotiate with their passengers for mutually acceptable compensation. Airlines generally offer a free trip or other transportation benefits to prospective volunteers. If the airline offers you a free ticket or a transportation voucher in a certain dollar amount, ask about restrictions. How long is the ticket or voucher good for? Is it “blacked out” during holiday periods when you might want to use it? Can it be used for international flights?

Involuntary Bumping

DOT requires each airline to give all passengers who are bumped involuntarily a written statement describing their rights and explaining how the carrier decides who gets on an oversold flight and who doesn’t. Those travelers who don’t get to fly are frequently entitled to denied boarding compensation in the form of a check or cash. The amount depends on the price of their ticket and the length of the delay. Here are the rules:

• If you are bumped involuntarily and the airline arranges substitute transportation that is scheduled to get you to your final destination (including later connections) within one hour of your original scheduled arrival time, there is no compensation.

• If the airline arranges substitute transportation that is scheduled to arrive at your destination between one and two hours after your original arrival time (between one and four hours on international flights), the airline must pay you an amount equal to 200% of your one-way fare to your final destination that day, with a $675 maximum.

• If the substitute transportation is scheduled to get you to your destination more than two hours later (four hours internationally), or if the airline does not make any substitute travel arrangements for you, the compensation doubles (400% of your one-way fare, $1350 maximum).

• If your ticket does not show a fare (for example, a frequent-flyer award ticket or a ticket issued by a consolidator), your denied boarding compensation is based on the lowest cash, check or credit card payment charged for a ticket in the same class of service (e.g., coach, first class) on that flight.

You always get to keep your original ticket and use it on another flight. If you choose to make your own arrangements, you can request an “involuntary refund” for the ticket for the flight you were bumped from. The denied boarding compensation is essentially a payment for your inconvenience.

If you paid for optional services on your original flight (e.g., seat selection, checked baggage) and you did not receive those services on your substitute flight or were required to pay a second time, the airline that bumped you must refund those payments to you.

As we all know, when it comes to rules, there are a few conditions and exceptions. Please visit the US Department of Transportation for more details.

As always be smart, be savvy, and equip.

Love Secret Eyes Everywhere?

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Turkish Airline Crew Successfully Delivers Baby Mid Flight, Mom Was 28 Weeks Pregnant

By: Customer’s Poet

Talk about Customer Service.

According to the Huffington Post, the crew of the Turkish Airline flight from Guinea’s capital of Conakry to Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso delivered a passenger’s baby mid-flight. Yes. I said they delivered a baby at 42,000 Feet altitude. I’m sure they did not learn this in med school.

The new mom was 28 weeks pregnant at the time of birth ad cleared to fly with a note. Yet, her daughter could not wait any longer.

Fortunately, the newborn and mommy were taken to a hospital in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso’s capital. They have been report as doing well.

As always be smart, be savvy, and equip.

Love Secret Eyes Everywhere?

Learn more about us visit www.secreteyeseverywhere.com.

Customers Leave Uber in Droves After Muslim Ban

By: Customer’s Poet

Cause and effect.

From the looks of things, President Trump is doing exactly what he said he’ll do. He is planning to build a wall along the US/ Mexico border and he has executed a Muslim Ban (which he believes will make America safer). Yet, in his mad dash to get things done, his lack of experience has showed up in many ways than one. Especially when it comes to the international affairs.

While the Muslim Ban was labeled as Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States, according to the New York Times it’s “cowardly and dangerous”. Not only has the ban effected Muslims and been deemed as illegal, but it caused a chain reaction of disturbances in the world of business as well. Disturbances, we believe, President Trump may have overlooked.

According to the Business Insider, thousands of Uber customers are deleting the app and after drivers continued doing business with JFK airport despite the taxi strike announced by the NY Taxi Workers Alliance. Which called for all drivers to avoid doing business with the airport between 6–7pm to protest against President Donald Trump’s executive order. Many customers are urging for others to fully deactivate their Uber accounts which require contact with (yes) their digital, online only, no telephone number customer service. Considering Uber’s alleged support for the president’s new laws, many customers have switched to Lyft which publicly claimed to be against the Muslim Ban.

But it’s not just Uber, according to Nextweb.com, AirBnB has stepped in to offer free housing to those stranded due to the passing of the Muslim Ban.

Even with many upset and at odds over his executive order, President Trump continues to be on the defensive. According to NBC News, the president stated the Obama administration previously identified the same seven countries banned in his Muslin Ban “as sources of terror”. A misleading statement as the designated seven nations were deemed dangerous for American citizens to visit, not designated as a source of immigrant-related terrorism.

Although President Trump’s intentions may be good, his actions have led to nothing more than protest.

As always be smart, be savvy, and equip.

Love Secret Eyes Everywhere?

Learn more about us visit www.secreteyeseverywhere.com.