Most Loved & Hated Airlines According to Customer Service

Most Loved & Hated Airlines According to Customer Service

By: Customer’s Poet

With so much negative news surrounding airlines these days, here are a list of the top-rated Airline according to customer service.

JetBlue (82) and Southwest (80) are in the lead while Alaska Airlines is close behind at 78.

JetBlue’s low-cost business model and cabin upgrades are paying off, while Southwest’s pricing policies (that include no hidden fees and no charge for a flight change), remain popular with customers.

Alaska Airlines, known for excellent customer service, is in the process of merging with Virgin America. While mergers often cause customer satisfaction problems, hence AT&T with DirecTV, for Alaska Air’s sake let’s hope it continues to improve.

American Airlines is up by six percent despite the viral incident involving a flight attendant violently taking a stroller away from a customer nearly hitting her baby. While our hometown airliner Delta is up seven percent with a 76, just one point above the industry average.

On the other end of the spectrum, United was the lowest-rated of the nation’s big three airlines even after improving by three percent scoring a 70.

At the bottom of the list once again: Frontier (63, down five percent) and Spirit (61, down two percent). People who fly Frontier and Spirit tend to have fairly low expectations for service — they simply want to get from here to there for as little as possible. Let’s just agree that you get what you pay for.

As always be smart, be savvy, and equip.

Love Secret Eyes Everywhere?

Learn more about us visit www.secreteyeseverywhere.com.

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Dragged Off Flight Due to Overbooking? Here’s What You Should Know.

By: Customer’s Poet

While United CEO Oscar Muñoz may have issued a public apology, the damage has already been done as the company’s stock is down by as much as 6% in premarket trading. Unfortunately for them, bad news travels fast.

Understanding all the trouble United has gotten itself into over customer service, even after reading that is not usually known for putting customers off of planes, here’s what you should know if an airline asks you to voluntarily give up your seat on an overbooked flight.

According to Popular Mechanics, airlines do have the power to remove a traveler from a plane, for any reason they deem necessary. When you purchase an airline ticket, you are entering into a contract, known as a “contract of carriage.” Few consumers exercise their right to get a copy of the lengthy document, much less read it, but they might reconsider that after this week’s United fiasco.

If you did not know your rights as an airline customer in the US, here are a few in regards to overbooking according to the US Department of Transportation:

Overbooking is not illegal. Most airlines overbook their scheduled flights to a certain extent in order to compensate for “no-shows.” Passengers are sometimes left behind or “bumped” as a result. When an oversale occurs, the Department of Transportation (DOT) requires airlines to ask people who aren’t in a hurry to give up their seats voluntarily, in exchange for compensation. Those passengers bumped against their will are, with a few exceptions, entitled to compensation.

Voluntary Bumping

DOT rules require airlines to seek out people who are willing to give up their seats for compensation before bumping anyone involuntarily. Here’s how this works. At the check-in or boarding area, airline employees will look for volunteers when it appears that the flight has been oversold. If you’re not in a rush to arrive at your next destination, you can give your reservation back to the airline in exchange for compensation and a later flight. But before you do this, you may want to get answers to these important questions:

• When is the next flight on which the airline can confirm your seat? The alternate flight may be just as acceptable to you. On the other hand, if the airline offers to put you on standby on another flight that’s full, you could be stranded.

• Will the airline provide other amenities such as free meals, a hotel room, transfers between the hotel and the airport, and a phone card? If not, you might have to spend the money it offers you on food or lodging while you wait for the next flight.

DOT has not mandated the form or amount of compensation that airlines offer to volunteers. DOT does, however, require airlines to advise any volunteer whether he or she might be involuntarily bumped and, if that were to occur, the amount of compensation that would be due. Carriers can negotiate with their passengers for mutually acceptable compensation. Airlines generally offer a free trip or other transportation benefits to prospective volunteers. If the airline offers you a free ticket or a transportation voucher in a certain dollar amount, ask about restrictions. How long is the ticket or voucher good for? Is it “blacked out” during holiday periods when you might want to use it? Can it be used for international flights?

Involuntary Bumping

DOT requires each airline to give all passengers who are bumped involuntarily a written statement describing their rights and explaining how the carrier decides who gets on an oversold flight and who doesn’t. Those travelers who don’t get to fly are frequently entitled to denied boarding compensation in the form of a check or cash. The amount depends on the price of their ticket and the length of the delay. Here are the rules:

• If you are bumped involuntarily and the airline arranges substitute transportation that is scheduled to get you to your final destination (including later connections) within one hour of your original scheduled arrival time, there is no compensation.

• If the airline arranges substitute transportation that is scheduled to arrive at your destination between one and two hours after your original arrival time (between one and four hours on international flights), the airline must pay you an amount equal to 200% of your one-way fare to your final destination that day, with a $675 maximum.

• If the substitute transportation is scheduled to get you to your destination more than two hours later (four hours internationally), or if the airline does not make any substitute travel arrangements for you, the compensation doubles (400% of your one-way fare, $1350 maximum).

• If your ticket does not show a fare (for example, a frequent-flyer award ticket or a ticket issued by a consolidator), your denied boarding compensation is based on the lowest cash, check or credit card payment charged for a ticket in the same class of service (e.g., coach, first class) on that flight.

You always get to keep your original ticket and use it on another flight. If you choose to make your own arrangements, you can request an “involuntary refund” for the ticket for the flight you were bumped from. The denied boarding compensation is essentially a payment for your inconvenience.

If you paid for optional services on your original flight (e.g., seat selection, checked baggage) and you did not receive those services on your substitute flight or were required to pay a second time, the airline that bumped you must refund those payments to you.

As we all know, when it comes to rules, there are a few conditions and exceptions. Please visit the US Department of Transportation for more details.

As always be smart, be savvy, and equip.

Love Secret Eyes Everywhere?

Learn more about us visit www.secreteyeseverywhere.com.